A Water Crisis Is Growing In A Place You'd Least Expect It

For months, Rev. Falicia Campbell kept a secret from her congregation, her friends and even her adult children. It was a secret she was ashamed to divulge: She was living without running water.

Like a growing number of Americans, the 63-year-old Chicago resident couldn't afford to pay her rising water bills. She inherited her mother's house in Englewood, a poor neighborhood on the city's South Side, and last year received a $5,000 bill.

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Supreme Court Stops Louisiana Abortion Law

The Supreme Court, divided 5-4, has temporarily blocked implementation of a Louisiana abortion law nearly identical to the Texas law the high court struck down in 2016. The court's action, however, is only a pause.

It allows abortion-rights proponents time to bring an appeal to a newly constituted conservative court majority that may nonetheless be willing to reverse course dramatically on the subject of abortion.

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Jean Templin
‘Late-term’ abortions — demystified The answers to all of your questions

President Trump in his State of the Union address on Tuesday called upon Congress to “pass legislation to prohibit the late-term abortion of children who can feel pain in the mother’s womb.”

This comes after two recent pieces of legislation made headlines — one that incorporates the Roe v. Wade standards into New York state law, and a now-tabled Virginia bill that would have eased access to “late-term” abortions if the health of the mother were at risk.

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Jean Templin
Bet everything on electric: Inside Volkswagen's radical strategy shift

WOLFSBURG, Germany (Reuters) - If Volkswagen realizes its ambition of becoming the global leader in electric cars, it will be thanks to a radical and risky bet born out of the biggest calamity in its history.

The German giant has staked its future, to the tune of 80 billion euros ($91 billion), on being able to profitably mass-produce electric vehicles - a feat no carmaker has come close to achieving.

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Jean Templin
Single women are defying the usual gender gap by purchasing more homes than single men

Single women are defying the usual gender gap by purchasing more homes than single men, even though female workers earn just 80 percent of what their male counterparts make.

Unmarried American women own around 22 percent of homes, while unattached men own fewer than 13 percent in the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan areas, according to online loan broker LendingTree, which used Census Bureau data from 2017 to reach its conclusions.

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Choosing greatness: It's Trump's Speech, But Women Have a Message, Too

WHITE HOUSE — 

On Tuesday, U.S. President Donald Trump is scheduled to give his second State of the Union speech, addressing a new class of Congress that has a record number of minorities and women.

Sitting behind Trump during the speech will be Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, who kept House Democrats unified against the president in a brutal fight over wall funding that triggered the longest partial government shutdown in the country's history.

The speech will be given a week later than the originally scheduled date of Jan. 29, after Pelosi blocked Trump from delivering his address until the government reopened.

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Jean Templin
Trump ignites California’s paradigm shift

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Delaine Eastin, the former California schools chief and legislator whose longshot bid for governor fizzled last year, has been in enough elections to know the difference between a stormy campaign season and a fundamental shift in the political climate.

Which is why the Democrat told a postelection symposium last week there's something familiar about the political moment at hand. The rhetoric of President Donald Trump, she said, reminds her of when Gov. Pete Wilson championed three conservative ballot measures more than two decades ago.

"They were being poked in the eye by a bully," Eastin said of young and minority Californians in the '90s. "When you look at Trump, what you see is the worst of that, quadrupled."

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Jean Templin
Nearly 4,000 additional troops heading to US-Mexico border

Nearly 4,000 additional U.S. troops will be deployed to the southern border to assist Customs and Border Protection, the Pentagon announced Sunday.

According to a statement released by the Defense Department, 3,750 troops will head to the border for 90 days to aid in placing razor wire along the border, as well as with mobile surveillance operations. The deployment will bring the number of active-duty forces in the area supporting Customs and Border Protection to roughly 4,350.

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Jean Templin
Women Who Dare To Bicycle In Pakistan

On a Sunday in early December, about two dozen women and girls weaved their bikes down the streets and alleys of the gritty Lyari neighborhood in the Pakistani city of Karachi.

They nudged their bikes between rickshaws, motorbikes and crowds of men — men everywhere. Some turned their faces away to avoid the sight of women rattling past on bikes. Others gaped.

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Jean Templin
Your Yoga Pants Are Polluting the Water You Drink

Every year, the average American throws away 70 pounds of clothing, sending massive amounts of textiles to landfills or incinerators and contributing to the emission of hazardous greenhouse gases, which speeds up climate change. There’s no question that the rise of fast fashion and the ever-increasing rate at which consumers are discarding clothes has contributed to fashion’s serious environmental problem. The industry is currently the second largest polluter in the world, after fossil fuels. And while companies and consumers areincreasingly doing more work to recycle garments and keep clothes out of landfills, only part of the issue is being addressed.

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Jean Templin
Judges grill FCC lawyer over net neutrality repeal

A panel of federal judges on Friday grilled the lawyer for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) over the implications of the agency's decision to repeal its net neutrality rules in 2017.

The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments from both sides in a case challenging the FCC’s order to eliminate the rules requiring internet service providers to treat all web traffic equally.

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Jean TemplinFCC, NET NEUTRALITY
Why the abortion debate won’t die Many culture wars are winding down — but not this one

The controversy surrounding William Barr’s confirmation as attorney general has mostly focused on his expansive views of executive power. But Barr’s views on social issues have also come center stage. After serving as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush from 1991 to 1993, Barr penned an essay calling on Catholics to fight abortion and to “restrain sexual immorality, obscenity, or euthanasia.”

For the most part, time seems to have passed Barr by. As marriage rates continue to decline, nonmarital cohabitation has spiked, especially among those over 50. In 2017, the number of Americans who saw divorce as morally acceptable hit an all-time high. Internet pornography is everywhere, and more than 40 percent of Americans find it morally acceptable.

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Jean Templinabortion
A climate problem even California can't fix: tailpipe pollution

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - For three decades, California has led the fight to control tailpipe pollution, with countless policies promoting cleaner gasoline, carpooling, public transportation and its signature strategy - the electric vehicle.

Rush hour traffic moves north and south on interstate 5 near Encinitas, California, U.S. October, 24, 2018.

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Jean Templin
USAID has ceased assistance to West Bank, Gaza

The Trump administration has reportedly ended foreign assistance to Palestinians in the Gaza Strip as well as ended $60 million in annual aid to Palestinian security forces in the West Bank.

A U.S. official on Friday told Reuters that the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has ceased funding for a number of projects that the U.S. has funded in the areas, including programs meant to improve access to clean water and economic growth projects. Aid from the agency was previously frozen last year.

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Trump administration secretly shipped plutonium to Nevada

The Department of Energy (DOE) secretly shipped about a half-ton of weapons-grade radioactive plutonium to Nevada despite the state’s opposition.

The Trump administration made the disclosure Wednesday as part of a federal court case in Nevada in which the state is trying to block the DOE from its publicly stated plans to ship radioactive materials from South Carolina.

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